Alluvion
ephemeral art
eco-art
environmental art
mail art
communtity art
interactive art
nature-based
outdoor installations
participatory art
public art
ecological art



alluvion






  
Diana Lynn  
   Thompson




  
   
Home

   
Gallery

   
Recent Projects
  
   
2000-2002

   
Contact
guestbook

Your feedback is welcome. Please
click here to send your comments or questions. They will be answered and/or posted on this page promptly.

....................................................................................................................................................


Saturday January 10th, 2004. At Booth canal Beach, in the darkening fog, among oystershells and seaweed, a small bright alluvion circle. Its been there almost two years- it must have been buried- for there it was, unabraded, a whole, perfect gift.   diana
............................

March 7 2004
This connection was sent to my by my sister of the sun in Montreal.
She and I share the passion of the sea.
So much of what I read is what I do and feel
                                                                                       :) Norma Czerny

............................

Great to see REAL art done by REAL people.  Lari Robson

............................

August 11,  2005

diana,

the whitemouth river in hadashville, manitoba, where we laid to "rest"
the alluvion shells in the winter three years ago, rises and falls
with the winds and rain.  it's quite low right now and i was playing
in the sand with my daughter a ways down river from where we
scattered those shells and there in the sand among the clams and
snails and snarled twigs was one of the shells.  this happened last
saturday.

funny.

erika

...............................

Summer 2005

    After Gill and I scattered our alluvion “shells” around the base of the dominant
rock on our favourite Saltspring Island beach, we returned sporadically to search for them - and for a few months, found at least a few on every visit. But this is a wave-exposed beach, and everything but the largest rocks moves around each winter as storms rework the beach. The alluvion pieces vanished after the first winter, buried in this process, reincorporated into the environment from which their material originally came. Every summer since, when I return again to the peace of this beach, I revisit
the big rock as a reminder of the mixture of durable and ephemeral that makes up the world. And this summer, glancing down at the base where we originally scattered our shells –  saw a single round piece, with rock-rounded contours and a slight change of colour, but immediately recognizable for what it was – one alluvion “shell’, amazingly redelivered by the sea to its point of origin.
                                                                             - Ann Gargett
<
<